Monday, September 11, 2017

You Heard it Here First--Linda Phillips' Second Novel Finds a Home!

As many of you know, I enjoy featuring my fellow writers' accomplishments. In that vein, I bring you news from my dear friend, Linda Phillips. Just for the record, Linda and I met 18 years ago when Fran Davis, the regional advisor for SCBW (there was no I back then) asked us to put together the 1999 conference. Linda and I hadn't even met before! But we pulled it off and became prayer partners and writing buddies. Here's proof that we are really "joined at the hip" as Linda often jokes.

When we went shoe shopping recently, we chose the same pair!

Without further ado, here's Linda to tell us about her next book.

What's the Pitch for Heart Behind These Hands?


Clair Fairchild is a teenage piano prodigyWhen faced with the news that both her younger brothers are dying of a rare childhood disease, she must reshape her musical dreams.

How did you come up with the idea for Heart Behind These Hands?


While this is not a sequel to my debut novel, Crazy, the seed for the story is buried (unintentionally) deep in those pages. When I needed to assign a devastating disease to a minor character in Crazy, coming up with Batten disease wasn’t exactly random.

I taught at The John Crosland School (formerly Dore Academy) and The Fletcher School, both of which serve students with learning differences.  At Dore, we had a student who was diagnosed with Batten in the third grade, and his younger brother met the same fate shortly afterwards.  At Fletcher a girl was ironically diagnosed by the same doctor in the same month.  This neurodegenerative disease robs children of all vision, mobility, cognitive and language skills. None of them is expected to make it far into their twenties.   

The girl, Taylor King, has a family that has formed a foundation, Taylor’s Tale, that has raised many thousands of dollars for research.  An older sister, Laura King Edwards, follows Taylor’s progress on her blog and has committed to running marathons in all fifty states to raise awareness. She has written a memoir, Run to the Light, documenting her first-hand experience watching the disease steal her sister’s life.
The first thing I did when I wanted to pursue a book with Batten as the villain, was to check with Laura and make sure my plans to write a fictional novel-in-verse depicting characters with Batten did not conflict with her memoir.  

We’ve since read each other’s work and are celebrating that our books will both be released in the fall of 2018. We’ve started to discuss ideas about the marketing possibilities that may present themselves under these fortuitous circumstances.  

What was your path to publication?


I began working on this book about ten months before Crazy came out.  During that time, you were the first (as always) to read my first twenty pages and then I sent off the first draft to my agent, Julia Kenny before I went into debut book frenzy.  She and I exchanged three rounds of drafts over the next year before she sent the first submissions out in early 2016.  It’s been wonderful having an agent both willing and able to step into the editorial role. 

We got some lovely, rosy rejections on that first round, and then a second round went out in Nov. 2016. It was met with silence. We both felt confident about the story and went into it with eyes wide open about the uphill battle that novels in verse can encounter. We even had some discussions about the fact that the country as a whole was in a particular, political funk at the time, because Julia said more than one of her clients was encountering the same eerie silence. If you find yourself in the same position, don’t dwell on these mysteries. Dive into the next thing as quickly as possible no matter how uninspired you feel at the moment. I did, and I’m better for it, and more than halfway into my third book.   

The second most wonderful thing about my agent is that she temporarily cut me loose from the contract to explore small presses on my own, while offering her assistance to review any offers. I spent about a week considering whether or not to try self-publishing and I quickly realized I lacked confidence in handling the process.  I started sending out queries in January, one of which was to Light Messages, a publishing house represented at a joint WNBA/CWC meeting in March.  When I mentioned that I had submitted to them the editor emailed me the next day saying she hadn’t received it.  She requested it, we clicked, and I signed the contract shortly thereafter.  Note about querying:  don’t be shy about following up. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain, like a “misplaced” manuscript.

Why verse?


I get this question a lot, and all I can say is it seems to be the way I think, or I should say, have thought.  I started out just writing poetry, and moving into novels in verse was like floating down river on a lazy summer day.  However, now that I look upstream and see the wake of ambiguities among readers, librarians, students and most of all, publishers, I’m going to hang up the rubber raft for now.  That being said, to keep the metaphor going, in my current work in progress, I’m slogging along the bank in bare feet which requires a different set of skills. I now must write in complete sentences and use a truckload more words than I’m accustomed to. And then there’s all that punctuation and capitalization that needs to be addressed!  But it’s all part of the journey and who amongst us writers doesn’t love the challenge of a brand new learning curve? 

   








20 comments:

Gray Marie said...

This sounds really good! I love books in verse.

Carol Baldwin said...

Thanks, Gray. I think you will love this book. Look for a giveaway eventually!

sheri levy said...

Congratualtions, Linda! I loved Crazy written in verse. I will look forward to reading your next- I'm glad you continued to pursue publication.

Connie said...

Congratulations to Linda. It sounds like a lovely story!

Carol Baldwin said...

Thanks Connie and Sheri!

Linda Vigen Phillips said...

Thanks Gray, Sheri, and Connie for the kind and supportive comments. And thanks, Carol, for giving me this "first opportunity" to talk about the book!

Carol Baldwin said...

My honor and pleasure, Linda!

Young Authors Program said...

Linda, that is awesome news! So excited to hear this. I will heed your advice about not being shy to follow up after a query for sure. :)

Carol Baldwin said...

Thanks, Dorothy!

Deborah Allmand said...

As a cousin to a Battens child, any publicity in any form which brings attention to the horrific disease is wonderful. More money is needed for research, facilities, research teams, trials, any and all things that can help eradicate this disease. I look forward to reading your book Linda but not importantly I look forward to a cure for this disease.

Carol Baldwin said...

Thanks, Deborah. You will really resonate with this book!

Clara Gillow Clark said...

Congratulations, Linda! Writing in verse seems so daunting, but it is something I’d like to try. Best wishes for success with your new book.

Carol Baldwin said...

Thanks, Clara!

Rosi said...

Wow! Great news! I loved Crazy and will be looking for this book. Thanks for the post.

Carol Baldwin said...

Thanks, Rosi. And look for a review and giveaway of this book too!

Linda Vigen Phillips said...

Thanks Dorothy, Deborah, Clara, and Rosa for your kind comments. As Carol mentioned, we are "on the road" right now, but will love to talk at length to any of you in more depth going forward!

Joan Y. Edwards said...

Dear Linda,
I am very excited for you and happy for you! Proud that you kept on going. Proud that your agent released you awhile because she believed in you and your story!!!!!!!!!

Thanks, Carol, for spotlighting Linda.

Never Give Up
Joan

Carol Baldwin said...

And thanks for encouraging us all, Joan!

Cat Michaels said...

Love hearing about the back story of this tale and the author's decision to write in verse.

Carol Baldwin said...

Thanks, Cat!